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revoltingeurope

Writer on Europe's Left, trade union and social movements @tomgilltweets or @revoltingeurope
revoltingeurope has written 880 posts for Revolting Europe

Renzi one year on: austerity still rules Italy

One year after PM Renzi came to power and three governments since Berlusconi, Italy is still depressed, thanks to unending austerity programmes, finds Leopoldo Nascia* Seven years of crisis and three and half years of political shocks the have brought, in succession, the governments Mario Monti, Enrico Letta and Matteo Renzi, have failed to pull … Continue reading

The EU agreement, structural reforms and the Syriza effect abroad: Inside View

Syriza’s Yiannis Bournous* in interview What assessment do you make of Friday’s agreement with the Eurogroup? The document adopted at the Eurogroup gives Greece an extra four months to present a developed plan of structural reforms. The document gives us breathing space, both in terms of time and economic conditions. Even if some of the … Continue reading

Greece: the euro misfit that Germany once embraced with open arms

Greece joined late and never conformed to Germany’s idea of the Euro, but it nonetheless served a very valuable purpose, explains Spanish economist Enrique Viaña Remis, who anticipates Spexit will follow Grexit Today, we talk insistently-indeed, all too insistently of Greece leaving the euro. The debate is raised in Manichean terms (at this time administrators of the … Continue reading

The costs and benefits of Grexit

Emiliano Brancaccio and Gennaro Zezza You cannot say that between 2010 and 2014, Greece has not “done their homework” assigned by the Troika. The tax burden has grown by five percentage points of GDP, public spending has fallen by a quarter and wages have fallen by twenty percentage points. The European Commission has always maintained … Continue reading

The Eurogroup-Greece Agreement

By Jacques Sapir The agreement reached Friday, February 20th between Greece and the Eurogroup has led to conflicting commentary. It is necessary, in order to understand this agreement, and to analyze it, to put it into context, both in the short and in the long term. This agreement was intended to prevent an immediate crisis, … Continue reading

I am ashamed to be European

By Giorgio Cremaschi Double standards have always been a hallmark of the European ruling classes. At least since the governments and liberal revolutions of the late 1700s proclaimed human rights, except for slaves overseas and most of the workers. Europe’s double standards collapsed exactly one hundred years ago with the first world war. After twenty … Continue reading

The Troika is dead! Long live the Troika

Portuguese radicals have accused the EU Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker of “hypocrisy” and seeking to “continue to the policies of the Troika without the Troika.” The leader of the European Commission said Wednesday that the “troika is undemocratic, it lacks legitimacy” and and it was time to learn  “the lessons of history and not repeat the same … Continue reading

France’s Loi Macron: the consecration of archaeo-liberalism

This week France’s government forced a controversial deregulatory economic bill through parliament by decree, provoking a confidence vote and further splits within the ruling socialists, with rebels including former minister Benoît Hamon. Drafted by a one-time investment banker and designed to win respite from the German-led EU over draconian deficit reduction demands, it has been pursued in the name of … Continue reading

Spain’s labour reform: three years on

By Vicente Clavero* Three years ago the Spanish government of Mariano Rajoy pushed through its labour reform against despite big opposition. Most of the parliamentary groups and social forces rejected it, to no avail; well founded warnings about possible consequences were ignored too. The absolute parliamentary majority of the Popular Party meant the law got … Continue reading

Consensus grows around Syriza in Greece: Interview with Greek journalist Synghellakis

Theodore Andreadis Synghellakis is a Greek journalist born in Rome in 1973 of parents who fled the fierce military dictatorship of the colonels. Correspondent for over twenty years for Greek TV station Alpha, the press agency Athens and Macedonian News Agency and the newspaper Efimerìda ton Syntaktòn, meaning of Newspaper of Editors, he has also … Continue reading

Spain, 1936; Greece, 2015

With a newly elected government opposing the troika’s  brutal austericide policies, Greece finds itself alone – like Spain was in 1936, argues Pedro Luis Angosto*  That history does not repeat itself does not prevent it from being cyclical; in other words whenever a period of progress occurs it provokes a reaction that tries to roll … Continue reading

Spain between political regeneration and class struggle

The traditional party of the radical left Izquierda Unida is facing a takeover by upstart party Podemos. Jesús Sánchez Rodríguez* analyses the dynamics within and between to the two organisations and the prospects for economic, social and political transformation in Spain The political project of Podemos began to be articulated about a year ago and … Continue reading

A new ‘fiscal’ currency to tackle the Eurocrisis, from Greece to Italy

Enrico Grazzini To overcome the crisis the new Greece’s Minister of Finance Yanis Varoufakis is considering a new national ‘fiscal’ currency to that proposed for Italy by myself and my colleagues Luciano Gallino, Biagio Bossone, Marco Cattaneo, Guido Ortona, Stefano Sylos Labini (Helicopter Money per l’Italia: uscire dalla crisi con l’emissione di nuova moneta statale-fiscale complementare … Continue reading

The coherence of Tsipras and lessons for Italy

By Giorgio Cremaschi If the new Greek government begins now to live up to his election programme by establishing the minimum wage to 750 euro per month Germany’s Merkel-SPD government will close the door to any negotiations on the debt. In fact, with the “reforms” that have made the German model to the whole continent, … Continue reading

Greece’s new government, Tsipras and the issue of sovereignty

Why did Syriza choose the Independent Greeks as coalition partner? And how will the other Eurozone countries react to the new Government in Athens? Jacques Sapir explains Syriza has won and secured 149 seats in the Greek parliament. Alexis Tsipras, its charismatic leader, is the big winner of the elections this Sunday, January 25th. Many people … Continue reading

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DATA

Anti-social Europe in numbers

WAGES SLIDE

Key facts and figures on wages across the EU

Wealth Inequality in Europe

Get the key facts and figures

RADICAL VOICES

A different take on European issues

Italy’s Healthcare Crisis

Health services are ‘close to collapse’ in Rome, Turin and Naples after years of cuts and privatisation.

550 days, 29 Workers, Zero Job Losses

How a few determined Italian women stopped their factory closing and protected their livelihoods

Filthy Rich

France's Bernard Arnault of the Louis Vuitton Moet Hennessy (LVMH) empire is worth $41 billion. Check out Europe's rich list

SANTA DRAGHI’S COMING

Private banks receive half-trillion-euro gift from ECB

POPULAR FIGHTBACK

Workers and citizens stand up for themselves

FLORENCE’S BUS LUMACA

Workers are on a go-slow over privatisation

Popular resistance delivers results

Lessons from the victory against Madrid privatisation plan

FRENCH FACTORY OCCUPATION

Hundreds of workers occupied the factory of ArcelorMittal in Florange in the north of France

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

in Italy the home is a very dangerous place to be

LABOUR RIGHTS

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Subjects

EUROPE NEEDS A CITIZENS’ REVOLUTION

Read the statement by Lafontaine and Melenchon

The Troika in Portugal – Three Years On

A success story?

THE EURO

The Dossier

FRANCE

GERMANY

GREECE

ITALY

PORTUGAL

SPAIN